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Quieting the Inner Voice and Enjoying the Day

By September 6, 2016 No Comments

Are you enjoying the season? Recently I’ve seen a lot of posts on social media reminding people that the seasons don’t change until September 22. It seems, as is human nature, people are rushing the next change!

We seem to want to grow up when we’re young, can’t wait for the holidays, or a vacation, or the summer months…whatever it is, human nature seems to be to rush things.

I, for one, try very hard to enjoy every day for what it is. Granted, some days that’s harder than others!

There are certainly days where that little voice keeps nagging at me, telling me that I won’t reach my goals if I don’t do more. Or that I should really do this or that if I am ever going to be where I want to be. Or my personal favorite…are you being the kind of example you want to be?

That voice certainly makes it a bit more difficult to enjoy each day for what it is. And some days, when the voice won’t quiet down, I’m ready for the day/week/month to just be over!

Now, I don’t have many of those days anymore. Man did I used to! I swear, my inner critic used to be so loud my neighbors could hear it!

And, even when it does pipe up these days I can quiet it much, much quicker than I used to be able to. All I need is a few minutes by myself to focus and practice a simple strategy and I’m usually good to go.

Want to know the secret? Do you have an inner voice that you can’t always quiet?

Ok, this is a super simple tool you can use when your inner voice decides it’s time to pop up. It’s been a reliable technique for me for years, and has never let me down. With the louder and more stubborn voice it may not silence it, but it always shifts my reaction to it!

Are you interested in that?

Cool. Here’s what I do.

First, I listen to the voice. I hear what it has to say and I pay attention to a few nuances. I notice what it sounds like, tone, volume and where it comes from. I pay attention to what it “sounds” like in my mind.

Then I play with that.

I change the tone. The volume. The speed. (Truth be told, for the really annoying voices I make them sound like the Chipmunks!)

I try different things and, with each change, notice how I feel. Does it shift my reaction? Do I mind it less? Does it make me giggle?

After all, the voice itself, the words it says…they mean nothing. Until I assign them a meaning. Right?

So, if I can change the meaning I assign them, then I change the reaction, the feeling, I have when I hear it.

And if I change the meaning, the reaction, and the feeling…then it’s not a bothersome voice at all!

The next time that nagging voice won’t be quiet, or is interfering with something you want to do give this technique a try. I bet you’ll be pleasantly surprised with the results.

Tom Dotz

About Tom Dotz